Book Reviews

Book Reviews

Welcome to our Book Reviews Page!  Grab a cup of tea or coffee and sit a spell-it’s time to relax over a good book.  You may use this page to find book reviews to our carefully selected collection of books.  Please check back often for new reviews and feel free to send us your suggestions, opinions or reviews of your own titles that are relevant to our cultural heritage.

1.  Panama Fever: Digging Down Gold Mountain by W.B. Garvey

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4 responses to “Book Reviews

  1. Susan Lawrence

    I thoroughly enjoyed this engrossing account of the construction of the Panama Canal! I highly recommend it to anyone looking for an entertaining read that is also built around heretofore unknown facts uncovered in the Author’s grandfather’s papers. It is hard to put down… one wants to keep on reading about Thomas and Byron, their continuing experiences, encounters and outcomes. Hats off to Mr. Garvey for an elegant, absorbing first!

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  2. I enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to anyone. The characters present a wonderful story about a period in history which is often neglected. I’m looking forward to the sequel.

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  3. Clearly, tremendous care has been taken in the writing of this fictionalized account of the building of the Panama Canal. One is not surprised to discover the author’s musical background: each page of dialog resounds with a melodiousness that could only be the product of a trained ear. Somehow, while faithfully reporting on actual events, Mr. Garvey has produced a page turner. “Gold Mountain” is populated by vital, alive characters who I grew to care about and whose stories I am eager to further explore. Is there a sequel in the works?

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  4. I found this a fascinating description of the building of the Panama Canal , presented with elegant and yet often relentlessly addictive writing style by W.B. Garvey in this, his first novel.
    The use of flashbacks and the interweaving of the two protagonists’ tales, combined with the often idiosyncratic language (Haitian French and Spanish), result in a fast-paced yet twisting tale with no easy conclusions at the end, leaving the reader to ponder the moral implications of an historical event which has often been presented from a one-sided viewpoint, and which Mr. Garvey has brought to life through writing about the unsung heroes of the Canal – the workers and immigrants who found a very different reality from that to which they had been led to believe they would find.

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